HENRY
n. A person with a substantial income, but who is not yet wealthy. [From the phrase High Earner, Not Rich Yet.]

Example Citations:
"All these luxury brands are extremely vulnerable, unless they have been selling only to the truly rich who are always going to be rich," Danziger said. But all of the luxury brands depend on the $250,000 to $500,000 income group, a cohort Danziger said has been dubbed "HENRYs: High Earners, Not Rich Yet."
—Joan Verdon, "Well-heeled shoppers having second thoughts," The Record, November 21, 2008

'My bonus is 'shameful' — but I worked hard to get it,' said John Konstantinidis, a wholesale insurance broker, lunching Friday at Harry's at Hanover Square.

'I'm a HENRY,' Mr. Konstantinidis added. 'High Earner but Not Rich Yet.'
—Alan Feuer and Karen Zraick, "It's Theirs and They're Not Apologizing," The New York Times, January 31, 2009

Earliest Citation:
A few more words about you. You account for a large portion of America's most ambitious, productive people—you are executives, law firm partners, airline pilots, doctors. You're not poor, of course. Even in places like New York City and San Francisco and Chicago, an income in the low to mid-six figures is hardly poor. But with high taxes and the all-around high cost of living, you certainly don't feel rich either. Most of you are "Henrys": High Earners Not Rich Yet.
—Shawn Tully, "Taxpayer, Beware!," Fortune, June 23, 2003

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